Sunday, May 24, 2020

Memorial Day "Murph" WOD

‘Murph’ is named after Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, who was killed in action in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005. He was 29-years-old. After graduating from Penn State University in 1998, Murphy rejected offers to attend law school and instead accepted a commission in the United States Navy and became a SEAL in July 2002. For a man whose nickname was ‘The Protector’, the decision made perfect sense. In fact, when Murphy was in the 8th grade, he was suspended from school for fighting with bullies that were trying to shove a special needs child into a locker. And Gary Williams, author of “Seal of Honor,” a biography of Murphy, recounts a story where Murphy protected a homeless man who was collecting cans from a gang of thugs.

In early 2005 Murphy was assigned to SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE as officer in charge of Alpha Platoon and deployed to Afghanistan. In June of that year, Murphy was leading a four-man reconnaissance team in Kunar province as part of a counter-insurgent mission (the other men in Murphy’s team were Danny Dietz, Matthew Axelson and Marcus Luttrell). During the mission the team encountered a group of local goat herders.

A discussion was held among the four SEALs regarding the rules of engagement and what they should do with the herders, who were being held at gunpoint. Eventually the men decided to release them, but not soon after the SEALs were surrounded and ambushed by an overwhelming Taliban force. Murphy, who was trying to reach HQ via satellite phone, willingly exposed himself to enemy fire by stepping into a clearing where he might get a signal to make the call. Murphy was shot in the back, but still managed to calmly complete the call for reinforcements and return to his position to continue the fight with his men. HQ sent an MH-47 Chinook helicopter to rescue the team, but while attempting to set down in rugged terrain, the helicopter was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, killing all 16 men on board.

Murphy, Dietz, and Axelson were all killed in action. Luttrell was the only survivor and was eventually rescued after several days of wandering the mountain and being protected by the people of an Afghan village.

We honor Muphy's memory by performing "Murph" every Memorial Day:

Who's Murph? - Copperhead CrossFit"Murph"
For Time:
1 mile run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Air Squats
1 mile run
*Rx weighted vest 20lbs/14lbs

Friday, May 22, 2020

NEW COURSE ALERT: FMT MOBILITY SPECIALIST COURSE


An evidence-informed self-myofascial release course that advances students’ understanding of foam rolling, massage stick work and mobility ball techniques as rehabilitation and performance interventions.

Ideal for range of motion improvement, performance hacks and athletic recovery enhancement.


FMT Mobility Specialist Course is an evidence-informed self-myofascial rolling course that advances students’ understanding of mobility techniques for their patient’s and client’s needs. FMT Mobility Specialist offers a practical framework and a systematic approach for determining why, how, when and where to roll for movement preparation, movement recovery or pain relief. Assessment systems will be presented examining concepts of joint by joint mobility, stability and fascial integrity. These systems will be utilized to direct fun and innovative lab experiences throughout the course.

FMT Mobility Specialist methodically integrates a review of the current literature and demonstrates the science behind rolling for improved rehabilitation or performance outcomes. Current concepts such as rolling with percussion/vibration will be explored with innovative solutions provided for common movement, performance and recovery challenges. This course is intended for health and fitness professionals with all levels of prior self-myofascial rolling experience.

Functional Movement Training (FMT) Certification courses are taught by industry leading experts in movement assessment, performance and rehabilitation. CEUs may be offered for DC, ATC, PT, LMTs, LAc, OTs and personal trainers – depending on location and class type. Please click on the date/location you are interested in attending to view complete CEU offering for that course.
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Educational Objectives of FMT Mobility Specialist
At the conclusion of the course, attendees will be able to:
  • Identify and discuss the history of self-myofascial release/rolling (Self-MFR) techniques.
  • Compare and contrast current foam rolling research studies.
  • Discuss and critique neurological vs mechanical physiological effects of self-myofascial rolling techniques.
  • Compare variables of ‘how’ we roll, including depth, duration and rate of rolling and the effects on the underlying tissue and patient/client outcomes.
  • Compare variables of ‘why and when’ we roll, including for movement preparation, movement recovery and pain relief.
  • Discuss, screen and apply joint by joint mobility and stability MFR techniques to explore a system of ‘where to roll’.
  • Discuss, screen and apply facial chain mobility MFR techniques to explore a system of ‘where to roll’.
  • Discover and experiment with various self-myofascial release application techniques for common complaint locations such as spine, upper and lower extremities.

https://www.rocktape.com/medical/education/mobility-specialist/

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Stand Up to Your Back Pain with Physical Therapy Relief

Most Americans will suffer temporary back pain at some point in their lives. When back pain is not temporary, however, it becomes a major quality of life issue. The good news is that you don’t have to live with back pain permanently. Taking a proactive approach like working with a physical therapist can help you find back pain relief at long last. 

Types of Back Pain

There are three main types of back pain:
  • Acute Back Pain: Acute back pain is the most common type. This is a temporary pain that goes away in less than three months.
  • Recurrent Back Pain: This occurs when acute back pain goes away for a while, but then comes back periodically.
  • Chronic Back Pain: If back pain lasts longer than three months without subsiding, it is classified as chronic.
Back pain is usually not serious and will resolve on its own. Recurring pain and chronic pain, however, can be a sign of a more serious health problem. There is a broad range of potential physical conditions that could be causing your back pain, which include osteoporosis, degenerative disk disease, a herniated disk, fractures or lumbar spinal stenosis.

Diagnosing Back Pain with a Physical Therapist

Your journey with a physical therapist will start with a discussion of your symptoms. Your therapist will also review your medical history for any past injuries or illnesses that could be contributing to your current pain. Your physical therapist will also conduct an exam to assess how you are able to move and function as a result of your back pain.
The diagnosis phase will also involve some tests to find symptoms of more serious conditions. If your physical therapist suspects that there is a serious health condition contributing to your back pain, you will likely be referred to a specialist for more testing. In most cases, this will not be necessary.

Physical Therapy for Back Pain

Once your back pain has been diagnosed, a personalized course of physical therapy will be outlined for you. Treatments for back pain will vary based on the diagnosis, your age, weight, physical ability and other factors. Your course of treatment may include any of the following:
  • Stretching and strength building exercises
  • Manual therapy and spinal manipulation to improve joint mobility and relieve tissue pain
  • Education on how to take better care of your back, such as proper methods of lifting, bending, sitting and sleep positions
  • Hot or cold treatments, or electrical stimulation, for pain relief
  • Posture work to provide better support for your back

Physical Therapy Strategies for Back Pain

Over the course of your work with a physical therapist, your progress will be monitored to ensure that you are recovering. The goal is to eliminate the back pain so that you can live a normal life. A big part of working with a physical therapist is that you will learn strategies for movement and carrying out daily tasks in ways that will prevent the pain from recurring.
For example, your therapist will show you proper posture techniques while you are at home, at work or enjoying leisure activities. You will also learn how to keep up a regular exercise regimen to keep your supportive muscles strong, which will prevent the back pain from coming back. If your weight is contributing to your back pain, you will learn nutritional advice in addition to exercise to control your weight and keep back pain at bay.
The key is to be proactive in standing up to your back pain. If the pain lasts longer than three months, it probably won’t go away on its own.