Thursday, February 28, 2019

Product Review: Titan Fitness Hefty Bench V2

Product Details:
Our version 2 of our Hefty Bench features our new enhanced vinyl for a unparalleled support, feel, and grip.

Fully utilize your bench for maximum power while also reducing your chances of injury with the Titan Hefty Bench. The added width and thickness gives your back and shoulders extra support for bench pressing.

Features: 
- Extra wide 24" base ultimate stability and support.
- Double sided gusset plates lock the bench top to the base.
- Constructed of heavy duty 3" x 3" tubing.
- Handle and wheels for easy movement and storage.
- 15" Wide pad is perfect for safely hitting you max bench press.

Specifications:
- Overall Length: 53"
- Overall Width: 24"
- Overall Height: 17"
- Bench Length: 50"
- Bench Width: 15"
- Bench Thickness: 4"
- Capacity: 1,200 LB
- Weight: 84 LB



Product Review:
I’ve been a big fan of the Titan Hefty Pad since the very first time I benched on one. It’s wider, longer, thicker, denser, and more supportive than any other bench pad I’ve ever seen or used. In addition to all that it has a unique, heavy-duty  vinyl cover that prevents any slipping or sliding around on the pad; a surprisingly uncommon feature for bench pads.

Built like a tank and the pad is a shoulder saver. I’ve been suffering from bicep tendonitis for over two years now, from playing college baseball - with this pad I’ve been able to bench 225 for reps without any pain.  Getting frustrated that my shoulder issues are holding me back I have tried a lot of things and finally tried the hefty pad, my shoulders got noticeably better. Just a couple weeks of using it my shoulders no longer hurt at night keeping me awake, like they used to. They are improving each week where benching isn't irritating them any more.
Some may worry that with training with this wide pad when they use a competition bench it will throw them off. While the setting up is a little different, I would rather have my shoulders pain free and adjust. Last week I went to another gym and used the competition bench and my shoulders hurt at night again, but was still able to set up okay on that bench.  If you’re a young gun out there - trust me - preventative measures now will make a huge difference in your longevity - you will still want to lift at 40 - at 50 - so get the fat pad.

The benefits of using this bench I can notice are: Promotes Scapular movement (which means it is uninhibited and eliminates AC tears), Eliminates Shoulder Hangover, Optimizes Back and Upper body Positioning,  Very little to no translational loading,  humeral wear on bicep tissue and pec tweaks are relieved, and it increases mechanic leverages.

It's heavier than expected and overbuilt to near perfection. The upholstery inside is thick and super dense meaning that it's the opposite of cushy (if you like softer foam, this is not for you). I like it because the density or hardness adds stability when using heavy weights. The cover material is the best I have ever seen or used. It's some kind of sticky rubberized material. Once you are in position, you will never slip.

In conclusion, This is an outstanding product. Very impressed with grip, size, width, and tank like feeling of this pad on this bench. Did bench immediately after receiving this beast of a pad in the mail and I am currently convinced I just bought a game changing piece to my ever expanding home gym.  It’s very sturdy, and versatile.  It has helped me tremendously with some issues I was having related to shoulder injury and poor shoulder mobility. I highly recommend it for any lifters with those sorts of issues.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Top 5 Kettlebell Movements - Part 2


The Snatch is one of the quintessential kettlebell movements; the combination of strength, power, stability, and cardiovascular fitness embodies kettlebell lifting perfectly. Whether you want to build power or strength endurance, the Snatch is a great exercise to add to your training. Another reason to love the kettlebell Snatch is that the movement is accessible to a larger population than the barbell Snatch; the mobility requirement is less stringent, with many of the same benefits.

Since the Snatch is a highly technical movement, take plenty of time to practice with a light kettlebell. The neuromuscular system needs time to coordinate the movement and build muscle memory. The shoulder also needs time to build stability in the overhead position. A great way to start is to practice the Half Snatch. This allows you to focus on the upswing of the movement before tackling the more challenging drop into the backswing. Once the upswing is mastered, you can work on the drop, making sure that you allow the bell handle to skip the center of your hand on the way down so there is no pulling on your palm, which can cause blisters and tears.

There are two variations in technique you can use on the Snatch. The first is a Snatch that uses a hinge motion, which is great for building strength and power. The second is a Snatch that uses a pendulum leg action, which is ideal for endurance work. Choose the variation that suits your goals, or simply the one you enjoy more!

1.      Start in a standing position with feet about hip width apart and a kettlebell in front of your feet. Grab onto the kettlebell with hook grip (bell handle in the fingertips, and thumb locked over the fingers).
2.      Pull the bell into the backswing, then drive with the legs to bring the kettlebell up. For the hinge-based power swing, use a hinge motion and extend the hips forcefully. For the pendulum-based endurance swing, use a slower pendulum leg action that follows the motion of the kettlebell.
3.      When the kettlebell reaches the float point (somewhere between hip and shoulder level), redirect the kettlebell into the overhead position as you punch the hand up and through the bell handle to meet the kettlebell in the overhead position. For the power swing, the arm and the kettlebell should stay tight to the body on the way up. For the endurance swing, the bell should be allowed to follow its natural path (which will be farther from the body) before redirecting into the overhead position.
4.      After stabilizing the kettlebell in the overhead position for a couple seconds, turn the bell and allow it to drop; give the kettlebell a head start before following it into the backswing with the torso. The arm should hit the hip before the torso folds forward.
5.      Once the kettlebell completes the backswing, go into the next repetition. 
The Renegade Row is a challenging core exercise that involves both pushing and pulling upper body components. The movement is comprised of one kettlebell push up followed by a row on each side from the plank position. One of the main functions of your core is to prevent trunk rotation, which requires your core, glutes, and hips to work together. Keeping the hips in place while performing rows in the plank position is a great way to train anti-rotation, as well as upper body pulling. The push up provides the upper body pushing component, and requires the core to stay active.

The Renegade Row should be trained with focus on form, not speed. Moving quickly typically leads to hip rotation and less core engagement. Instead, move slowly and deliberately to ensure proper body position in each part of the sequence. Start with 3-5 repetitions and work up to 10 repetitions. When you can easily complete 10 repetitions at a particular kettlebell weight, you can move up to a heavier weight.

1.      Start in the plank position with a kettlebell underneath each shoulder. Begin with the feet spread apart wide, and move them closer if you want to make the movement harder.
2.      Perform a push up, keeping the elbows in close and the belly button pulled up toward the spine to engage the core.
3.      From the plank position, perform one row on each side. Try not to move the hips -- this is the anti-rotation component -- and think of pulling the elbow and hip toward each other while you row.
4.      Once you complete the rows, go into the next repetition.


About Kettlebell Kings
Kettlebell Kings is a premium-quality kettlebell and kettlebell content provider, based in Austin, Texas. You can view our equipment, kettlebell how-tos, and get expert advice at https://www.kettlebellkings.com and https://www.kettlebellkings.com/blog/. For more information, call us at 855-7KETTLE to learn more.


Friday, February 22, 2019

Open Workout 19.1 Tips sponsored by Leopard Claw

Time to bust out our latest Open 2019 workout! Here’s what we’ve got to get you fired up this week:

15 min AMRAP
19 Wall balls
19 Calorie Row

As usual, it looks easy at first glance. But this workout can take a hefty toll on the unprepared. Here are our expert tips to get you through with peak performance.


Wall Ball Tips
  • Keep your elbows high and in, with your hands underneath the ball instead of on the sides. This will help prevent shoulder and arm fatigue.
  • Keep your chest up and try not to round your back so your lungs stay open and your breathing steady.
  • Break up the wall balls early (like 10/9) and then however you need to break them up as you listen to your body. But take only a second or two for your breaks, then get back to that wall!
  • If you have lifters, wear them! The added heel lift will help keep proper form through all your squats.

Rowing Tips
  • Don't go too hard out of the gate. Keep your pulls long and steady so that you don't exhaust yourself early on.
  • Keep good posture with your chest up. This will help catch your breath and keep your lungs open.
  • Use your legs more than your arms. Even though you're doing tons of wall balls, your legs are stronger than your arms! Wall balls will tax your shoulders, so give them a bit of a rest using mostly your legs to row.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

WOD Wednesday #97

5 rounds of continuous movement of:
2 legless rope climbs, 15-ft. rope
20 controlled, slow AbMat sit-ups


STIMULUS: When I see something that has a set number of rounds on it – especially something unfamiliar like this workout – I usually assume it works best if the volume is preserved. So as backwards as this could sound, the easy bet for scaling would be to turn this thing from a task priority inside a task priority, to a time priority inside a task priority (Inception, anyone?) For example, 5 rounds of 45 sec. rope climbs and 1 minute of AbMat sit-ups. Or for easier counting, 1-minute and 1-minute. If you’re working out by yourself, you could do what I am now calling Ricky-style Reps (named after one of our 8th graders) where you just do one movement until you would have to rest due to fatigue then move to the next one. Again, the retest value is tough when doing that, but this doesn’t seem like an easy one to retest anyway. The Ricky-style would also help with the “continuous movement” part.

GROUP: Equipment might be the limiting factor here. When this is an issue, it’s best to look at each exercise not as the specific thing prescribed, but as something to be grouped into a large, inclusive general movement pattern. So really, what’s the difference between rope climbs and pull-ups and ring rows and farmer’s walks and grabbing your dogs’ leashes while they pull you as you’re trying to walk? Lots of things obviously, but they one thing they have in common is they’re all expressions of pulling. So as long as you’re doing something most of the group can do that makes them feel like they’ve been pulling with their arms, you’re on the right track for the rope climb sub. Then the closer you can get to the specifics the better. So strict pull-ups with an alternating grip (flipping hands each round), jumping and hanging from a bar (flexed or extended), halfway up rope climbs using your legs, full climbs with the legs… think general not specific and then the specifics will come to you. When I get around to doing this, I’ll go legless as high as I can then use my feet to finish. Or maybe just call it good where I end up haha. Depends how I feel. As for sit-ups, I find it hard to keep a good position while using an AbMat, and some people have complained about back pain after doing lots of regular sit-ups. So we do hollow body variations; only going as far back as you can maintain a hollow body (low back staying in contact with the ground, among other things). Try those if you don’t have AbMats. On a very important note, I really hate sit-ups. Probably my worst exercise for some dumb reason. 

INJURY: Looks like spine/hip stuff and shoulder/arms are going to be the only issues I can think of. Static plank/hollow hold would be a good sub for sit-ups if need be. As for the rope, anything one-arm would be good. If it’s a broken finger that can’t wrap around a bar or rope, you can try doing slow descents from a push-up or handstand. It’s technically pulling as far as I understand.

Monday, February 18, 2019

Top 5 Kettlebell Movements - Part 1


While getting depth in the squat is important to to involve the glutes and hamstrings (as opposed to using the quads only), the spine should stay neutral throughout the movement. Try not to let your butt tuck under in the bottom position; if it does, you are likely going lower than your range of motion allows and your lower back will take some of the load. Mobilizing the hips and hamstrings prior to squatting can improve depth and activation of the posterior chain.

The Goblet Squat can be utilized to build strength by completing sets of 3-5 reps; Kettlebell Kings bells go up to 203 lbs, so there is a bell weight to challenge almost anyone’s strength! The Goblet Squat can also increase strength endurance and metabolic conditioning; simply use a repetition range of 8-20 with a lighter weight. A fun variation to try is the Goblet Squat Curl, which requires holding the bottom position while doing a bicep curl - guaranteed to cause extra muscle pump!

1.      Stand with feet about hip width apart. Bring the kettlebell into the goblet position, grabbing hold of the handle on other side.
2.      Squat down while keeping the chest up and weight in the heels. An easy way to determine proper depth is to bring the elbows to the inside of the knees. The spine should stay neutral.
3.      Drive into the ground as to come back up to standing position, contracting the glutes and fully extending the hips.

The Turkish Get Up (TGU) is a total body movement that builds shoulder stability and core strength. Since there are many parts to the movement, be sure to practice the sequence with bodyweight initially. Ensure proper and smooth execution of the entire movement before adding a kettlebell. You should have control over each part of the movement; if someone yelled “freeze!” at any point, you would be able to stop and maintain stability of the kettlebell.

The TGU is best practiced in sets of 1-5 repetitions. There is a lot of focus required, so doing a lower rep count will ensure better quality movement. Build up your volume slowly by increasing the number of sets. I recommend being able to do at least 3-5 perfect repetitions with the weight you are using before moving up in weight. A perfect repetition means there is no wobbling of the kettlebell and you have complete control of each portion of the movement (including the return to the floor).  

The TGU can be practiced in parts as well. Typically the most challenging part of the movement is the Turkish Sit Up (also known as the Half Get Up), which is the initial portion of the movement where you come to an upright torso position with hips still on the floor, then slowly return to the floor. When training toward a heavy TGU, it’s helpful to work on the TSU with heavier weights than what you would use for the full TGU. Besides the TSU, other parts of the TGU to isolate would be the pass through of the leg from the TSU into the Kneeling Windmill, the Kneeling Windmill, and the Overhead Lunge.

1.      Start lying on your side in the fetal position. Insert your hand fully through the kettlebell handle.
2.      Roll onto your back, keeping both hands over the kettlebell handle and elbow tight to the body. Set the legs about 45 degrees apart, with the leg bent and foot flat on the side you are holding the kettlebell. The other leg should be straight.
3.      Press the kettlebell up until the arm is straight and the weight of the kettlebell is balanced over the shoulder. Remove the free arm and place it on the floor, palm down and about 45 degrees from the body.
4.      Use the elbow of the free arm and the foot of the bent leg to drive into the ground and bring yourself up onto your elbow, then up onto your hand.
5.      Lift the hips, then pass the straight leg underneath until the knee is under the hip. Keep your eyes on the kettlebell.
6.      Bring the torso up straight, then pivot the back leg so you are in a lunge position.
7.      Drive into the heel of the front leg to come up to a standing position.
8.      To reverse the movement, step back with the leg opposite to the side youre holding the kettlebell and come back into the bottom of the lunge position (knee resting on the floor).
9.      Pivot the back foot in, then slide the free arm down the thigh and onto the floor directly beneath the shoulder. Pass the back leg through the free arm and the front leg and set your hips down onto the floor.
10.  Lower down to the elbow. As you lower all the way down to the floor, feather the kettlebell across the body slightly to slow its descent.

The Bottoms Up Press (BU Press) is an upper body pushing exercise that encourages proper mechanics for the shoulder and activates the neuromuscular system. Due to how hard the handle must be gripped during this movement, muscles that wouldn’t contract on a regular press are suddenly brought to life, i.e. rotator cuff, core, glutes, lats.

Since the BU Press is much harder than a regular press, start with a light weight and let the body adapt before trying anything heavy. The BU Press can be utilized in a training program like any other upper body pushing exercise -- and may actually be better than other pushing exercises for anyone with shoulder pain. To build muscular endurance, train higher repetitions with lighter weight. To increase strength, train lower repetitions with heavier weight.

Before even attempting the BU Press, you should know how to fail out of the movement safely. If you fail before the kettlebell reaches shoulder level, you can simply use the free hand to prevent the bell from hitting you. If you lose control of the bell in the top position, simply let the bell fall and step in the opposite direction so the bell drops onto the floor. Another precursor to doing the BU Press is to have a solid and stable BU Clean. If you perform a poor BU Clean, the BU Press that follows will not go well! You should be able to stabilize the kettlebell in the BU rack position before attempting a press overhead.

1.      Start in a standing position with feet about hip width apart and a kettlebell in front of your feet.
2.      Hinge at the hips and grab onto the kettlebell handle, then hike the kettlebell back between the legs. Fully extend the hips and bring the kettlebell into the rack position, with bottom side up. Stabilize the bell here first; if you have a bad clean, re-clean the kettlebell before attempting the press.
3.      From the bottoms up rack position, inhale and engage the lats by pulling the shoulder down and away from the ear. Press the bell overhead as you exhale.
4.      Hold the bell in the top position for 1-2 seconds before slowly lowering the bell down with control, again engaging the lats by pulling the shoulder down.
5.      Once back in the rack position, prepare for the next repetition.


Thursday, February 14, 2019

Don't Mask Pain Symptoms - Get to the Root Cause

Pain can be a helpful messenger, an alert that something in your body needs fixing ‒ but it can also be an agonizing annoyance that ruins your quality of life. To make matters worse, many pain problems are rooted in deep-set underlying conditions, often originating in a different part of the body than the part exhibiting symptoms. Medication may mask your pain temporarily, but it isn’t going to solve a chronic underlying functional problem. For a more meaningful pain solution, take advantage of the drug-free options we offer at Motus X Physical Therapy

The Origins of Pain Problems

The cause of acute pain may be clear enough, especially if it accompanies an auto accident injury, work injury, infection, operation or other event. As the affected part of your body heals, the pain generally fades away. But this is not necessarily the case with some forms of pain. Chronic pain may linger for months or years with no obvious cause in sight. This pain may be due to:
  • Areas of internal scar tissue buildup that restrict neighboring muscles and connective tissues (adhesions)
  • Extended disuse after a lengthy recovery period (such as frozen shoulder after many weeks with your arm in a sling)
  • Degenerative joint conditions such as osteoarthritis, which produce chronic pain and inflammation
  • Muscle weakness, knots or spasms related to poor posture or an unbalanced body
  • Chronic pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia, which may affect both nerves and muscles
  • Chronic overuse injuries such as tendonitisplantar fasciitis or carpal tunnel syndrome
Modern medicine tends to turn to drugs early and often in an effort to alleviate pain problems. Unfortunately, this approach may turn out to be nothing more than a stopgap. The drugs may mute the pain for a few hours, but the underlying problem that’s causing the pain remains untreated. As long as that problem persists, so will your long-term pain problems. This may force you to use more and more medication ‒ a troubling proposition, especially for addictive personalities or individuals who are already on other medications.

Natural Treatment From Our Physical Therapist

Our physical therapists can succeed where painkilling drugs fail. Once we understand the actual origin point of your pain, we can prescribe a physical therapy regimen aimed at correcting (or at least reducing) that functional abnormality. Our physical therapists may start by addressing your immediate discomfort with passive physical therapy techniques. These natural treatment techniques can include any combination of:
  • Deep tissue massage to break an adhesions grip on your internal tissues
  • Heat or cold applications to reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Electrical muscle stimulation, which uses tiny amounts of current to stimulate your body’s natural painkillers (endorphins)
  • Leg Compression Therapy
  • Taping
Once you’re responding to passive physical therapy, we can introduce active physical therapy. Our physical therapists can prescribe exercises that address both localized pain and referred pain problems. For instance, gentle stretching exercises from our physical therapists can loosen tight, painful muscles and increase mobility in arthritic joints, while core training exercises that correct your balance may relieve chronic strain or neurological symptoms in the body.
How effective is physical therapy as a drug-free natural pain solution? The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) states that non-pharmaceutical pain treatment is to be preferred over pharmaceuticals such as opioids ‒ and may actually do a better job of controlling pain conditions.

Monday, February 11, 2019

Product Review: Bear Komplex Carbon Fiber 3 Hole Grips

Product Details:
Have you ever been to a competition and been faced with a slick bar or a bar that you are not used to? If so, the new BKX Carbon Comp grips are for you! Our PATENT PENDING one of a kind technology allows these grips to stick to any bar, no matter the scenario. YOU DON'T EVEN NEED CHALK!!! Built with the same quality craftsmanship as our other grips, the Carbon grips are made for slick and powder coated bars.
  • As always, we protect the wrist from the buckle and use only the highest quality stitching to ensure they hold up. Grab a pair today and don't worry the next time you see a new bar. 
  • Manufactured from lightweight and sticky carbon fiber which feature a custom wrist strap which is designed for comfort and support positioned under the buckle. Bear KompleX Cross training grips will NOT dig into your wrist! 
  • Protect your hands and palms during Pull ups, Chest to bar, Muscle ups, Toes to Bar (T2B), Knees to Elbow (K2E), Kettlebell swings, Power lifting, Power Cleans, Deadlifts, Snatches, Gymnastics, and more... 
  • Durable triple stitching will ensure full support and stability when using the Bear KompleX gymnastics grips. You shouldn't have to worry about your hands when dominating your Cross training WOD! 
  • Our superior carbon fiber product will protect your hands and mold to fit the bar you are holding. Be sure to protect your hands during your Cross training WOD to maximize your output. 
  • Reduce slipping on the bar and keep banging out those pull-ups. Great for the Speal bar too! 

Product Review:
I have been participating in crossfit for a couple years now. I was getting discouraged about my lack of progress on bar movements. Anytime I jumped up to a bar for t2b or kipping pull-ups I could only perform a couple of repetitions before having to let go from hand pain and fear of tearing. I had tried 4-5 different grips to no avail. Then finally I went for the bear complex carbon fiber 3 finger hole grips that I saw other people using at the gym.

It was instant change in my ability to maintain grip on the bar. I was able to dramatically increase my reps on the bar without the pain and fear of ripping my hands. The wrist straps are comfortable and do not dig in. I also got a larger size since I prefer not using the finger holes. The carbon fiber does seem to possess an almost sticker quality to the bar compared to other materials. At the end of the day these grips are worth every penny.
Along the way of learning muscle-ups, toes-2-bar, butterfly PU and other high bar moves my hands would tear. Those of you who are learning a new technique know my plight when you are making GREAT progress and now it is hindered with torn hands. Some grips gave protection longer than others, but it was just a matter of time before ripping again.

In the end, I was thinking it was bad technique, but that WAS NOT the case. I tried numerous hand grips ( four different POPULAR brands, not store knock-offs) recommended from fellow crossfiters to reading online reviews, I even made some from 1" athletic tape.

Now, I have been using the 3 hole Carbon Fiber grips for several weeks with the same workout intensity and frequency, and have not torn either hand..... I guess you could make the argument that I have gotten smarter OR better with each technique, but I believe that would be reaching. If the previous statement IS TRUE, then the Carbon Grip were a HUGE part with protecting my hands... Fact is, I can't use torn hands as an excuse now..... Just give them a try

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

WOD Wednesday #96

Strict and for time:
10 pull-ups
20 push-ups
30 squats
Row 2,000 m
15 pull-ups
30 push-ups
45 squats
Row 1,000 m
20 pull-ups
40 push-ups
60 squats
Row 500 m



STIMULUS: This is one where I think it’s really important to understand “movement factors.” These can include range of motion, speed, fatigue, volume, and competition. Any or all of these factors can be added to movements in an attempt to make it difficult for an athlete to hold the standard. I see this one using cardio/respiratory fatigue as a movement factor to test out the strict movements we’ve been practicing over and over and over and over and over and over since the new year. To preserve the stimulus, the only thing I would scale for most people is the row (or run, in our case). I think if you can make these an all-out effort (or close to it) on the row/run, it will expose a lot of things on the pull-up and push-up station. Use the same “strict” standard you’ve been doing for the past workouts and see how well you can hold yourself to it despite your lungs wanting to explode. If you’re really brave try 5-sec. tempo squats without stopping.

GROUP: On an individual level (and with a well-seasoned group) I like the descending row/ascending gymnastics reps. It serves a good purpose on both stations. For my group I might have like Jay and a few other seasoned kids do rx’d; the rest will probably be something along the lines of: 3 rounds, Run/15/30/45. This keeps the numbers the same and might keep confusion/checking the whiteboard down. Haven’t decided how I’ll do pull-ups yet. I am thinking about breaking out the rings on this one, but kind of want to keep with the bar hang/half range/strict kipping pull-ups we’ve been doing. 

INJURY: The row/bike sub works for most people with issues on ground impact. Hollow hold/knees to elbows/sit-ups might be good for squats. One-arm presses and ring rows would not be a bad thing for arm injuries. 

I’M SCALING THIS WELL IF: You’re questioning the meaning of life while approaching the second set of the triplet. 

I’M SCALING THIS POORLY IF: Wait, what number am I on again? 

Monday, February 4, 2019

Product Review: Disruptive Strong Bag

Product Details:
  • Included Shotbells were custom designed to allow one DisruptiveStrong Bag to vary in weight, and can also be used like a dumbbell, kettlebell, barbell, medicine ball, and slam ball without bursting or damaging floor surfaces. 
  • Life happens in multiple planes of direction, but traditional fitness has led us to train in only two directions. Training in only two planes of motion creates muscular imbalances and puts us at risk for injury and poor function. 
  • With DisruptiveStrong, you can incorporate real world movement patterns with each workout, and start to look better, feel better and perform better. 
Your Choice: (Beginner OR Intermediate OR Advanced)


Beginner Includes:
— 10 Pound Shotbell
— 20 Pound Shotbell

Intermediate Includes:
— 10 Pound Shotbell
— 20 Pound Shotbell
— 30 Pound Shotbell

Advanced Includes:
— 10 Pound Shotbell
— 20 Pound Shotbell
— 30 Pound Shotbell
— 40 Pound Shotbell
  • CHANGE THE WEIGHT: The DisruptiveStrong Bag is incredibly versatile. The workout bag itself weighs 10 pounds and you can add our Shotbells to add weight. Each Shotbell weighs 10, 20, 30, or 40 pounds. That means you can add up to 100 pounds for the training bag to weigh up to 110 pounds. The Shotbells can also be used like a dumbbell, kettlebell, barbell, medicine ball, and slam ball. Our bag is perfect as a heavy punching or striking bag and great for weighted workouts and MMA training. 
  • DURABLE AND STURDY: Our fitness bag is sturdy enough to slam, drag, strike, swing, and lift while holding all of the steel shot bags inside. A durable vinyl material makes the outer shell and a flexible neoprene cylinder makes up the inside. The reinforced handle stitching helps make it resistant to tremendous intensity. It makes for great youth fitness equipment and boxing and MMA equipment. 
  • 5 GRIP OPTIONS: The DisruptiveStrong Bag is great with its 5 different hand grips. For a wide grip, grab the handles on the edges of the bag. To get a neutral grip, use the handles perpendicular to the bag. To get a suitcase-like grip, hold the center handle. For an overhand or underhand grip, use the handles parallel to the bag. Add the DisruptiveStrong Bag to your home exercise equipment. 
  • APP WORKOUT BONUS: You don’t just get an amazing weightlifting bag. You also get a DisruptiveStrong workout app, which includes over 1,000 unique exercises and over 350 always different workouts that get updated every month to help you so you’re always gaining muscle and burning fat with your Strong Bag. Up your weightlifting workout routine with the DisruptiveStrong Bag and our workout app. 
  • 3-YEAR WARRANTY: Each purchase of workout equipment comes with a “7 Guidelines to Shed More Fat” PDF and a 3-year warranty in the unlikely event of defects in the product's materials or manufacturing. Dragging or slamming the Shotbells and Strong Bags on abrasive and sharp surfaces such as gravel, rocks, grass with sticks, etc. will void the warranty. 



Product Review:
Meet the DisruptiveStrong Bag: a training bag that you can strike, slam, lift, or drag to burn calories and build strength in your body. You will be able to change its weight from 10 to 110 pounds. The bag supports over 700 exercises, many of which simulate functional everyday movements. You can use the Shortbell filler weights like a dumbbell, kettlebell, or barbell.

As a complete training system, the DisruptiveStrong Bag is soft enough to strike, but strong enough to take abuse.  It is a padded cylinder that can be filled with small, weighted bags to create a weight from 10 to 110 pounds. The cylinder can be used for a martial arts workout or it can be used like a dumbbell or kettle bell for weight training.You can use the Shortbell filler weights like a dumbbell, kettlebell, or barbell. The solid yet flexible inner core and the soft, shock-absorbing outer shell are two key qualities that allow you to lift, strike, slam, and drag this remarkable tool. From military grade vinyl to double and triple stitching to soft, resilient silicone handles, the DisruptiveStrong Bag was built for comfort, sleekness, and longevity.

The most impressive piece of equipment on the market by far! It is very easy to use and can be used in the comfort of your house and easy to travel with. Literally hundreds of exercises can be done with the equipment, so your workouts are versatile and not repetitive. You will gain strength and muscle while losing fat and inches. Anyone despite their current fitness level can utilize this equipment because weight is easily added! Well worth the investment. I regularly work out at a CrossFit Gym and every time I workout with the Disruptive Strong Bag I am completely sore all over again. It hits muscle groups that no other method of working out can due to the weight shifting and sand movement. The design and durability makes it a great long term investment and a great workout tool and easily portable for workouts on the go.

It arrived at my door and the first thing I noticed was the quality as it was pieced in about 6 different packages.  For most people its going to take a while to get used to the weights. It's unconventional and I can tell this thing is going to make you work. The shotbells are either heavier or I'm just not as strong as I think. The handle is a huge plus. The workouts you can perform are endless.  The bag is durable and versatile. You get multiple grip options and an easy weight changing mechanism.

In conclusion, this product is strong, versatile, and extremely convenient. The bag and shot bells allow me to perform the functional fitness workouts I am accustomed too. I no longer have to go to the gym to use different weighted sandbags, Bulgarian bags, and different kettle bells.  I was looking for something that did it all in one complete package and allowed for me to travel with it. That's when I found the Distruptive Strong Bag, the Swiss Army knife for fitness training. This product is legit and will push you to the next level in training.